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Section 4.0 – R2 on 2nd Base

Section 4.0 – R2 on 2nd Base

4.1 – General Positioning – Starting Position “C” with R2 on 2nd Base

4.1.1 – BU’s Starting Position with R2 on 2nd:
* BU will position on the 3rd base side of the infield. 
* BU will position himself midway between the edge of the grass of the pitcher’s mound and the 2nd base cutout,
* BU should position himself so that if an “imaginary” line were drawn from home plate through the left edge of the pitcher’s mound towards 2nd base, BU would be straddling that line.
* BU’s body should be squared to the edge of home plate. 
* This position is often referred to as Starting Position “C”

Important Notes:
* (The positioning just described refers to fields where the grass lines are as recommended the Official Rules and as shown in Diagram 4.1.1.  BU will have to adjust accordingly on fields which vary from this standard.)  This is the same positioning that will be used with a runner on 3rd base only, runners on 1st and 2nd, 2nd and 3rd or bases loaded.
* This starting positioning “C” with a runner on 2nd base only is very important, and umpires should make sure that they are not too deep towards 2nd base when they assume this position.  If BU is positioned midway between the mound and 2nd base as described in the previous paragraph, he will be in a good starting position for steals at 3rd base (see Section 4.3) as well as other plays to the infield.

Diagram 4.1.1: Starting Position “C” with R2 on 2nd base only.

4.2 – Pick-Off’s at 2nd Base and Rundowns with R2 on 2nd Base

4.2.1 – Proper Starting Position Leads to Superior Play Viewing:
* Proper Starting Position Essential for Pick-Offs at 2nd or Steals of 3rd (see Diagram 4.1.1): 
o It is very important that BU assume the proper starting position “C” in the middle of the infield with R2 on 2nd base.  This starting position is particularly critical when it comes to pick-offs at 2nd or steals of 3rd base because if BU is too “deep” towards 2nd base to start with, he will never be able to get a proper angle for the pick-off at 2nd or steal of 3rd base and will end up looking up the back end of the play of both. 

4.2.2 – Pick-Offs with R2 on 2nd Base are Covered with Some Similarity to Steals of 2nd:
* Pick-Offs by F1 with R2 on 2nd Base are Covered with Some Similarity to Steals of 2nd:
o As BU sees F1 begin the pick-off move towards 2nd base, he will “drop step” (“open the gate”) and angle his movement towards the right field “gap” (F4’s normal position) with his left foot.
o BU will keep his eye on the ball and not turn his back on it. 
o As F1 releases the ball, BU should use explosive “cross-over stepping” to aggressively gain distance. 
o BU should shoot off the back of the ball as it goes by and let the ball turn him into the play. 
o Just after the ball passes BU, he will begin to settle into the play by turning and focusing on the play. 
o By this time BU should be in proper position and angle for the play at 2nd (ideally a few steps to the home plate side of the 2nd base cutout and nearly on an “imaginary” line from home plate through 2nd base). 
o It is imperative that BU be completely set and not moving for this play.
* Pick-Offs by F2 with R2 on 2nd Base are Covered with Some Similarity to Steals of 2nd:
o As BU sees F2 begin the pick-off move towards 2nd base by reading F2’s initial body language during his throwing motion, BU will “drop step” (“open the gate”) and angle his movement towards the right field “gap” (F4’s normal position) with his left foot.
o Since the throw from F2 has farther to travel and is a longer developing play, BU should be able to achieve better positioning for this play.
o BU will keep his eye on the ball and not turn his back on it. 
o As F2 releases the ball, BU should use explosive “cross-over stepping” to aggressively gain distance. 
o BU should shoot off the back of the ball as it goes by and let the ball turn him into the play.
o Just after the ball passes BU, he will begin to settle into the play by turning and focusing on the play. 
o By this time BU should be in proper position and angle for the play at 2nd (ideally a few steps to the home plate side of the 2nd base cutout and nearly on an “imaginary” line from home plate through 2nd base).   
o It is imperative that BU be completely set and not moving for this play.

Diagram 4.2.2: Pickoff attempt of R2 at 2nd base

4.2.3 – Rundown Between 2nd & 3rd Bases on R2 (see Diagram 4.2.3-a & 4.2.3-b):
* When these rundowns start, BU is responsible for it entirely (see Diagram 4.2.3-a & 4.2.3-b).
* When PU sees the rundown, PU will run down the foul line towards the 3rd base cutout.
* PU should wait until BR is running the opposite way from the cutout before setting up in the cutout.  (He must be careful not to run his partner off during the rundown.)
* As PU is moving into the cutout and is ready to assume responsibility, he will communicate to BU, “I’ve got this end, Bill! I’ve got this end!” 
* PU will then be responsible for any play made on BR at the 3rd base cutout area only.
* BU will still have the responsibility for the rest of the rundown (see Diagram 4.2.3-a & 4.2.3-b).

Diagram 4.2.3-a: BU covers R2 on a rundown between 2nd and 3rd bases until PU can position to take the 3rd base end of the rundown

Diagram 4.2.3-b: With R2 in a rundown between 2nd and 3rd bases, PU moves into the cut out and notifies BU of his arrival to help out

4.2.4 – Coverage for a “Broken Play” During a Pick-Off with R2 on 2nd (The ball gets away and rolls towards the outfield) (see Diagram 4.2.4):
* Should the ball get away at 2nd base and roll towards the outfield, BU must be prepared to move into position for a possible play at 3rd base if R2 decides to go. 
* BU must be prepared to move into position for a possible play at 3rd base if R2 decides to go. 
* BU must also keep his eye on the original play at 2nd base, watching for possible obstruction. 
* As R2 is getting up and deciding to try for 3rd, BU should cut towards the “imaginary” 45 ft. line on the 3rd base foul line, making sure that BU stays in front of R1 and that he keeps his eye on the play for any possible obstruction. 
* He must glance at the location of the ball and then glance back at R2 so as to “key” off the reactions of R2. 
* Should BU see R2 commit to 3rd on this play, BU should quickly break roughly towards the cutout at 3rd, moving in the direction of an “imaginary” 45-foot line along the 3rd base line. 
* It is imperative on this play that BU NOT run parallel to the baseline with R2.  This almost certainly results in R2 beating BU to 3rd and BU looking up the back end of the play at 3rd – a terrible position to evaluate the play. 
* Should a play be made on R2 at 3rd base, BU must also come to a stop and be completely set for the play.

Diagram 4.2.4: Pickoff attempt of R2 at 2nd base with an overthrow

4.3 – Steals at 3rd Base with R2 on 2nd Base

4.3.1 – Proper Starting Position Leads to Superior Play Viewing:
* Successful Coverage Starts Before the Play with R2 Stealing 3rd:
o It is important that BU has established a good original starting position “C” in the middle of the infield-one that will be advantageous for steals of 3rd as well as pick-offs at 2nd base.  BU’s starting position “C” should not be too ”deep” towards 2nd base, yet not too close to the mound (see Section 4.1.1).

4.3.2 – Reading the Beginning of R2 Stealing 3rd:
* BU should be adept at recognizing that R2 on 2nd is stealing through being alert and picking up certain actions and cues on the field. 
o BU should be able to pick up on R2 breaking towards 3rd base through “feeling” and hearing him taking off as well as reading to the defense’s exclamation, “Going!” as R2 breaks towards 3rd base. 
o It is an optional mechanic for BU to take a quick glance over his right shoulder the moment the pitcher commits his delivery to the plate - This would be done so that BU has an actual view of the runner breaking towards 3rd.
* BU should begin his reactions to this play when he realizes R2 is attempting to steal 3rd. 
* PU will watch for the batter interfering with F2’s throw to 3rd.  If it is questionable as to whether or not the batter interfered with F2’s throw, it is permissible for PU to call and signal, “That’s nothing” (arms extended in a safe mechanic), indicating there was no interference on the play (this is an optional mechanic and is not required). 

4.3.3 – Positioning Mechanics for R2 Stealing 3rd (These are handled with some similarity to pick-offs at 1st base.) (See Diagram 4.3.3):
* BU should angle by “opening the gate” towards an “imaginary” 45 foot mark on the 3rd base foul line. (It is important that BU NOT move directly towards 3rd base on this play because this will result in a very poor angle for BU, one that is looking up the rear end of the play.  BU must be sure not to run parallel to the baseline in moving into position on the play at 3rd base (instead, he should break towards 3rd base at an angle.)
* BU must be aware of the fact that the ball may be hit to start a play, it may be hit directly at BU and need to be avoided or that a check swing is possible on the pitch.  BU should be aware of these situations and react accordingly. 
* Before the pitch clears the batter and is caught by F2, BU’s first movements will start under control (like walking towards the “imaginary” 45 foot mark).
* Once the ball clears the batter & is received by F2, BU will shift gears by “busting” hard with explosive “cross-over stepping” and extending further toward the “imaginary” 45 foot mark.
* BU must keep his eye on the ball until the pitch is received by F2 and throw committed to 3rd base.
* Once the throw passes BU, BU will begin settling into position for the play. 
* Then BU turns, faces the play, and sets for the call. 
* Proper angle and being completely stopped for this play are critical for BU.
* PU will watch for the batter interfering with F2’s throw to 3rd.  It is permissible (but not required) for PU to use the mechanic, “That’s nothing” in cases of questionable interference (arms extended in a safe mechanic), indicating there was no interference on the play (this is an optional mechanic and is not required). 
* After the ball is thrown to 3rd base, PU will simply observe the play, not leaving the plate area other than perhaps swinging out a step or two to his left to watch the play.

Diagram 4.3.3: R2 on 2nd base only with steal at 3rd base

4.4 – Ground Balls to the Infield with R2 on 2nd Base

4.4.1 – PU’s Mechanics on a Ground Ball to the Infield with R2 on 2nd (Not Rolling Up Either Base Line) (see Diagram 4.4.3-a):
* PU will stay home
* On a ground ball to the infield (other than those rolling down the foul lines), PU will swing out from behind home plate a few feet into foul territory in the direction of 3rd base to observe the play. 
* PU will be responsible for the touch of 3rd base by R2 from 2nd and will stay at home for any possible play there (see footnote).

4.4.2 – PU’s Mechanics with a Ground Ball Up Either Base Line with R2 on 2nd:
* PU must come out from behind the plate and be prepared to make a fair/foul decision on the ball. 
* If the Ball Is Up the 3rd Base Line:
o PU would observe the play and then retreat home (unless the crew is using the mechanic referred to in the footnote at the bottom of this page).
* If the Ball Is Up the 1st Base Line:
o PU may hesitate briefly on the line to observe the play at 1st base and watching for Primary/Secondary Responsibilities (There are three reasons for having PU come up the line):
* PU will be watching for interference by BR while out of the 45-foot lane.  Should PU see such an infraction, he should make the call.  This is not to say, however, that BU may never make such a call.  For example, if BU observes BR interfere with the play at 1st base while clearly out of the 45-foot lane, it is of course permissible for BU to make this call also.
* PU will be ready for any overthrows at 1st base.  If PU sees the ball being overthrown at 1st base, he will immediately and rapidly move with the overthrow and take responsibility for the ball going out of play.
* PU is also in position to help on “swipe tags” on BR at 1st base.  Although this is rarely used, it is permissible for BU to ask for help on a “swipe tag” on this play – if, for some reason, BU does not have a good look at the play.  (Note that the “appeal” should be initiated by BU immediately and before a confrontation with a player or manager occurs.)  The terminology by BU would be, “Bill, did he tag him?” or “Bill, do you have a tag?” while pointing to PU.  The response by PU would be a very emphatic, “Yes! He’s out on the tag!” or “No! He missed him!” while using a strong visual signal. 
o Then, PU would then retreat home immediately, preparing for any possible play at the plate. 

4.4.3 – BU’s Mechanics on a Ground Ball to the Infield with R2 on 2nd (see Diagrams 4.4.3-a to 4.4.3-c):
* BU will cover all plays at 1st, 2nd and 3rd. 
* BU will step up and turn with the ball, facing the fielder as he is fielding the ball. 
* BU will initially stay in the approximate position he started
* BU must then react to the development of the play with good anticipation as to how the play may develop. 
* He must let the ball take him to the play and be aware of the concepts of proper distance and angle to the play as well as being completely stopped and set for the play. 
* BU must recognize that there are several possibilities as to how the play might develop, and he must react accordingly. 
* If the initial play by the infielder is made on BR at 1st base, BU must be aware that any following play on R2 originally on 2nd base also belongs to BU also, and BU must “bounce” back towards R2 after the play at 1st base*** (See Note).

*** Note: With R2 on 2nd base only, some experienced crews prefer to let PU help out on a play at 3rd base following a play on BR at 1st base.  This is a permissible mechanic but should be used only by experienced crews.  Loud, clear communication MUST be used if the crew is using this mechanic.  This is not recommended for umpires in the early stages of development. (See optional positioning for PU in Diagram 4.4.1.)

Diagram 4.4.3-a: Ground ball to infield with R2 on 2nd base only.  Play at 1st base with BU “bouncing” back.

Diagram 4.4.3-b: With a ground ball to infield with R2 on 2nd base only and a play at 1st base, BU “bounces” back to 3rd for additional R2 coverage.

Diagram 4.4.3-c: With a bunted ball to infield with R2 on 2nd base only and a play at 1st base, BU “bounces” back to 3rd for additional R2 coverage.

4.5 – Fly Ball and Line Drive to the Infield with R2 on 2nd Base

4.5.1 – Responsibilities for a Fly Ball or Line Drive to the Infield with R2 on 2nd (see Diagram 4.5.1):
* PU has responsibility for all fly balls and line drives to F1 
* PU will also take all fly balls fielded by F2. 
* PU is responsible for the F3 or F5 moving towards the foul line
* All other fly balls and line drives to the infield are the responsibility of BU.

Diagram 4.5.1: Responsibility for all infield fly balls and line drives with R2 on 2nd base only

4.5.2 – PU’s Mechanics When a Fly Ball or Line Drive Is Hit to the Infield with R2 on 2nd:
* PU should swing out from behind home plate a few feet into foul territory in the direction of 3rd base to observe the play (unless the ball is hit near the foul lines). 
* If the fly ball is hit near the 1st or 3rd base line, PU will straddle the line to make the call.
* PU’s positioning on line drives to the infield would be exactly the same as just mentioned for fly balls with the exception that it is permissible to move out in front of the plate for line drives back to F1.

4.5.3 – BU’s Mechanics When a Fly Ball or Line Drive Is Hit to the Infield with R2 on 2nd:
* BU will step up and turn with the ball and face the infielder.
* BU should glance back over his shoulder at 1st base to watch BR touch 1st base. 
* It is permissible for BU to take a couple steps backwards toward the mound to open up the field of play as the fly ball is hit. 
* If the infielder is moving in to make the play, BU may have to move several steps – including to either side of the mound – in order to give the fielder room to make the play. 
* BU must guard against taking himself completely out of position in case the ball should be dropped.

4.5.4 – Remember to Vary the Intensity of Voice & Signal:
* If the fly ball is a “routine” catch, the umpire need not call or signal anything. 
* However, if the catch turns out to be a “difficult” play, the umpire would sell the call as needed.

4.6 – Fly Ball and Line Drive to the Outfield with R2 on 2nd Base
   
4.6.1 – Responsibilities for a Fly Ball or Line Drive to the Outfield with R2 on 2nd (See Diagram 4.6.1):
* Fly balls (or line drives) from F7 straight in all the way to F9 straight in (sometimes referred to as the “80%” or the “V”) belong to the base umpire (BU). 
* Fly balls (or line drives) where F7 moves any distance towards the left field line - his right - (sometimes referred to as the “10%”) belong to the plate umpire (PU). 
* Fly balls (or line drives) where F9 moves any distance towards the right field line - his left - (sometimes referred to as the “10%”) belong to the plate umpire (PU)

Important Note: It is important that the two umpires communicate after the ball is hit on fly balls and line drives to the outfield, particularly when balls are hit to F7 or F9.  The reason here is so that each umpire is certain who has responsibility for any given fly ball or line drive to the outfield.

Diagram 4.6.1: Fly Balls and Line Drives to the Outfield Responsibilities – This coverage is sometimes referred to as “80% - 20%”” or “the cone” fly ball coverage.

4.6.2 – Fly Ball or Line Drive to the Outfield with R2 on 2nd: 
* Both umpires will need to look at the outfielders in order to determine who has responsibility for the ball as described in Section 3.6.1.
* PU will swing out from the plate a few feet in foul territory in the direction of 3rd base to observe the play. 
* PU has the responsibility of watching R2 from 2nd base touch 3rd. 
* PU will also help watch for any infractions which might occur on the play.
* BU will step up, turn with the ball, and back up only two or three steps towards the mound to open up the playing field. 
* (NOTE: We call this area behind the mound the “working area” for BU.  From this “working area” he is in good position for observing his responsibilities and for moving into proper position as plays develop.)  When BU has multiple runner responsibilities, if no play develops after the base hit, BU should maintain his basic position in this “working area” and not be drawn unnecessarily towards a base without a potential play developing there.
* “Pause-Read-React” Technique: BU should use the “pause-read-react” technique to allow the play to develop and reveal enough information to determine whether the play is a “trouble” play or not.  After the ball has been determined to belong to BU (the ball is batted to BU’s outfield coverage area), BU will:
o “Pause” (hesitate momentarily to gather information about the developing play)
o “Read” (focus his attention on the reactions of the outfielder(s) by  taking his eye off the ball, zeroing in on the of the outfielders movements,  “keying” off the outfielders reactions, and watching for–and determining if the outfielder’s reactions reflect “trouble” or reflect ”trouble” cues). 
o “React” (remain in the “working area” on “routine” outfielder reactions or “go out” on “trouble” reactions to the ball by going to the edge if the infield grass, but never leaving it). 
*  “Difficult” plays are defined as home runs; balls hit off the outfield wall; diving catches; catches made by the outfield below his waist on a dead run; catches made with fielders converging on the ball; catches by the outfielder with his back towards the infield; catches made by the outfielder at the wall or on the warning track; etc.

4.6.3 – “Routine” Outfield Fly Ball or Line Drive in BU’s Responsibility Area with R2 on 2nd:
* BU will use the step-up, turn & face the ball and pause-read-react techniques (described in section 4.6.2) in deciding whether or not he should move to the edge of the grass (See Diagram 4.6.3).
* Since this is a “routine” play, BU will end up backing up two or three steps towards the mound in this process and opening up the playing field to observe the catch. (NOTE: We call this area behind the mound the “working area” for BU.  From this area he is in good position for observing his responsibilities as well as for moving into proper position as plays develop.)
* BU watches R2 at 2nd tag-up, and glances over his shoulder to see BR touch 1st, if the catch is dropped (see Diagram 4.6.3). 
* When BU has multiple runner responsibilities, if no play develops after the base hit, BU should maintain his basic position in this “working area” and not be drawn unnecessarily towards a base without a potential play developing there. 
* If BU has only a single runner responsibility after the fly ball, then after the catch BU should “drift” in the direction of R2. 
* If the catch is “routine”, BU need not call or signal anything. 
* BU is responsible for the catch, the tag-up at 2nd and BR touching 1st; and by backing up these steps behind the mound, BU will have an easier view for watching these responsibilities.  This technique also allows BU to move easily into position for plays at any base.

Diagram 4.6.3: “Routine” fly ball to right-center (or middle of the outfield) with R2 on 2nd base, tagging and advancing to 3rd

4.6.4 – “Difficult” Outfield Fly Ball or Line Drive to BU’s Responsibility Area with R2 on 2nd:
* BU will use the step-up, turn & face the ball and pause-read-react techniques (described in section 4.6.2) in deciding whether or not he should move to the edge of the grass (See Diagram 4.6.4).
* If the fly ball or line drive results in a “difficult” play, BU should again move to the edge of the infield grass in the direction the ball is hit to cover the play, but never leave the infield grass. 
* BU will sell the call from this position and glance at R2 at 2nd for tag-up purposes (if the ball is caught). 
* BU is also responsible for the touch at 1st base by BR, and this would be accomplished by BU glancing over his shoulder at 1st base.
* BU must immediately “bounce” back from the edge of the infield grass to pick up responsibility of the base runners.

Diagram 4.6.4: “Difficult” catch/no catch in right-center with R2 on 2nd base only

4.6.5 – “Difficult” Outfield Fly Ball or Line Drive Down the Right Field Line in PU’s Area with R2 on 2nd: (if the fly ball or line drive causes either F9 to move any distance towards the right field foul line):
* PU will communicate to his partner, “I’m on the line, Bill!” 
* PU will move up the 1st base line to observe and rule on the play, BUT only so far that he is certain he will have enough time to get back to home plate for any possible play there.  This is an important concept for PU to learn because his position down the 1st base line will vary based on the location of the ball, the location of the runner from 2nd, the number of outs, etc.  The key to remember is that PU will go only so far as that he knows he will have time to get back home. 
* PU will come to a stop to see the play and make the call.
* After he has ruled on the play, PU will normally “bounce” back home IMMEDIATELY and be ready for any possible play there. 
* PU still has responsibility for the ball going out of play, and so there may be occasions when he may “linger” on the line, watching the ball; but normally he will break quickly back home, keeping his eye on the ball.
* PU must never go so far down the line so that he does not have ample time to return to the plate and set up in proper position for any play at the plate (see Diagram 4.6.6 on the next page).

Diagram 4.6.5: F9 moves toward the line for a fly ball 

4.6.6 – “Difficult” Outfield Fly Ball or Line Drive Down the Left Field Line in PU’s Area with R2 on 2nd: (if the fly ball or line drive causes either F7 to move any distance towards the left field foul line):
* PU will take the ball and communicate loudly to his partner, “I’ve got the ball, Bill!” or ... That’s my ball, Bill!” 
* PU will move up the 3rd base line to observe and rule on the play, BUT again only so far that he is certain that he will have enough time to get back to home plate for any possible play there. 
* PU will come to a stop to see the play and make the call and normally will immediately “bounce” back home.
* PU keeps his eye on the ball since the ball is his responsibility in this situation. 
* PU must never go so far down the line so that he does not have ample time to return to the plate and set up in proper position for any play at the plate (see Diagram 3.6.7 on the second page).

Diagram 4.6.6: PU taking ball hit near left field line with R2 on 2nd base only

4.6.7 – Remember: The First Priority – Watching the Ball:
* IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT IN FLY BALL COVERAGE, THE FIRST PRIORITY IS THE BALL. 
* There could be an occasion when BU may miss BR touching 1st base because he had to keep his eye on the ball. 
* There may also be a time when BU does not have the best look at the tag-up at 2nd because he had to move to the edge of the grass for a “difficult” catch in the outfield. 
* This is simply a drawback of the two-umpire system. 

4.7 – Base Hit to the Outfield with R2 on 2nd Base

4.7.1 – Responsibilities on an “Obvious” (“Clean”) Base Hit to the Outfield with R2 on 2nd, (i.e., no possible fair/foul or catch/no catch on the play):
* PU will stay home, watch R2 touch 3rd and observe the play. 
* BU has the responsibility of the touch of 1st by BR. 
* BU will have responsibility for any plays at 1st, 2nd and 3rd. 

Diagram 4.7.1-a: “Clean” Base hit to the outfield with R2 on 2nd base only

4.7.2 – Mechanics on “Obvious” (“Clean”) Base Hit to the Outfield with R2 on 2nd, (i.e., no possible fair/foul or catch/no catch on the play):
* PU will swing out from behind home plate a few feet into foul territory in the direction of 3rd base to watch R2 touch 3rd.
* PU will stay home and observe the play as it develops. 
* As the ball is hit to the outfield, BU will step up, turn with the ball, and back up only two or three steps towards the mound (into the “working area”) to open up the playing field. 
* BU has the responsibility of the touch of 1st by BR. 
* BU will have responsibility for any plays at 1st, 2nd and 3rd. 
* BU must be ready to move into position for any play on the bases, and he will let the ball take him to the play –  keeping in mind the concepts of proper distance and angle to the play as well as being set to see the play and make the call.  (See Section 3.7.3 – “Staying within the Working Area”) 
* As the ball is hit to the outfield, it is not a bad idea for PU to communicate to his partner, “Staying home, Bill” as a reminder that BU has all plays on the bases.

4.7.3 – Staying within the "Working Area":
* As the ball is being thrown to the infield with multiple runners on base, BU should not “drift” (or commit) unnecessarily towards a base. 
* BU should let the ball take him to the play
* If no play develops (or is anticipated) on the bases, he would basically maintain his position within the "working area." 
* Only when BU anticipates the potential for a play should he move out of the "working area" and into a position for his play. 
* This is an important concept and mechanic and applies to all situations when more than one runner is on base.

4.8 – “Time” Plays  with R2 on 2nd Base

4.8.1 – Possible “Time” Play Situation with 2 out and R2 on 2nd:
* The two umpires would alert each other to this situation with a prearranged inconspicuous signal before every batter when there is a runner on 2nd base and 2 out.
* (A commonly used signal is to indicate 2 out and then to point down to home plate. Both umpires would signal this.)

4.8.2 –”Time” Play with 2 outs and R2 on 2nd: 
* On virtually any ball hit to the outfield PU will stay home (an exception would be if PU must go up the 1st or 3rd base line to rule on a play in his area of the outfield – and even then he would immediately break quickly (“bust”) home for the “time” play after ruling on the play). 
* PU should communicate his location to BU on any obvious hit to the outfield by shouting, “Staying home, Bill!” or “I’m going home, Bill!” 
* This reminds BU that he has responsibility for all plays at 1st, 2nd and 3rd.
* It also reminds PU of the potential for the “time” play to occur and the necessity for him to stay home and in proper position for that reason (see Diagram 3.8.2).
* PU will position approximately 6 to 8 feet behind home plate in a straight line between R2 touching home and the 3rd out occurring on the bases. 
* PU will watch carefully to judge whether R2 touches the plate before or after the third out is made on BR on the bases. 

Diagram 4.8.2: PU setting up for “time” play – R2 scoring with BR being thrown out at 2nd base with two out

4.8.3 – PU Will Communicate This Information to the Official Scorer by turning towards the press box and using the following mechanics:
* If the run scores: “That run scores!”  “That run scores!” (while facing the plate and pointing twice at home plate emphatically with his right arm); and then turning around and pointing up to the press box while exclaiming, “Score that run!” (Alternative terminologies include: “The run scores! The run scores! Score the run!” or “Score that run! Score that run! That run scores!”)  (Note that if more than one run scored on the play, PU would additionally indicate both visually and verbally to the official scorer the total number of runs that scored on the play after  displaying the time play mechanic.)
* If the run does not score:  “No run scores!”  “No run scores!” (or “No run! No run!”) while the press box and waving his arms in a cross-wise fashion in front of his upper body above head level.

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